Indian Agricultural has come a long way through, almost parallel to Indian civilization. The simple self contained family pursuit is now enormously externalized. As the invention of “Wheel” paved a way for industrial revolution, so is the invention of 1st agricultural implement i.e. “Plough” in agriculture, for improved and scientific agriculture.

Agriculture

The department of agriculture established in 1881 formulated various projects for research and extension to improve the standard of life of farmers. Post independent India between 1940 – 1970 attained self sufficiency in food production by extensively growing wheat and paddy. This was possible only because of the systematic transfer of technology to farming community by the extension service of the agriculture and rural development departments. The research, innovations and packages developed by the agricultural scientists for increasing production and productivity are transferred to the farming community so as to bring in the desirable changes in their knowledge attitude and behavior through extension network of the department agriculture for their overall and sustainable development. The forward and backward leakages are also taken care of – as the university of agricultural sciences other agricultural research stations allied line developmental departments, NGO’s, FIG’s & CIG’s are considered as partners and facilitators in this pursuit (Annexure -1). The department works on the 3 tire system i.e Zilla Panchayat, Taluk Panchayat & Village Panchayat.

The department of agriculture in Karnataka is all set to facilitate and support the farming community, specially the small, marginal, SC/ST segments, who are in sizable numbers for their overall and sustainable development. This facilitation has been the major objective of the department with the changing priorities of farming and also in mitigating the resultant consequences.

Changing priorities of farming:

  1. Family farming : Initially it was a family pursuit and way of life
  2. Surplus farming: to produce more and increase production to meet food security
  3. Market farming: to meet family expenses and growing financial requirements
  4. Commercial farming: due to liberalization, privatization & globalization the farming shifted to international market competition.

The resultant consequences are :

  1. Dependency on external agricultural inputs
  2. Monocroping
  3. Intensive land use and neglect of soil and moisture conservation practices
  4. Lack of natural resource management on farms
  5. Low fertility level of soil
  6. Hazards of excessive irrigation
  7. Increasing resistance in insect pest against pesticides
  8. Forgetting eco-friendly agriculture
  9. Traditional and indigenous food crops such as Millets becoming extinct
  10. Non adaptation of integrated farming systems

The task:

Over the years, to meet the changing needs of the farming and the farmers the department of agriculture is engaged in transfer of technology to bring in desirable changes.

To quote a few,

Earlier it was

  • Grow more food campaign
  • HYV programme
  • Fertilizer promotion programme etc.

Now the thrust areas are :

  1. Integrated farming system
  2. Organic farming
  3. Bho-Chetana
  4. Improving the soil health and fertility
  5. Production, distribution & use of certified seeds
  6. Popularizing the use of bio-fertilizers, bio-pesticides, bio-cultures, soil amendments, micro nutrients, plant based pesticides etc.
  7. Farm mechanization
  8. Micro irrigation systems – Sprinkler and Drip irrigation
  9. ATMA
  10. NFSM
  11. A3P
  12. ISOPOM
  13. INSIMP
  14. Cotton Mini mission
  15. RKVY
  16. Crop Insurance
  17. Post harvest technology
  18. Supply of agricultural implements/PP equipments
  19. Popularizing IPM/INM
  20. Quality control of agricultural inputs
  21. HRD through training and exposure visits

All these and various other schemes are formulated based on the farmer needs. Facilities / incentives / subsidies are provided to farmers through the Raita Samparka Kendra Staff (RSK) along with the technical know –how.

Crop demonstrations (Result demonstration & Method demonstration), exposure visits, field days, farmer scientist interactions, Kisan Goshtis, Training programmes, crop competitions, Krishi Pandit Awards, plant protection campaign etc. are organized to educate farmers.

Feed back:

The feedback received from the farmers is taken care of by addressing their problems in adoption of technology in a fortnightly workshop at taluka level and bi-monthly workshops at district level supported by the technical resource persons from the university of agricultural sciences besides making individual field visits by the extension staff.

Supporting organization:

The department is working in close liaison with the supporting organization such as KSSC, KSSCA, NSC, KOF, NABARD, Banks, marketing federations, input supplying institutions, Seed producers, APMC’s & other line developmental departments such as Zilla Panchayat, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, Sericulture, KWDP, Fisheries, Forestry etc. as all these institutions work for the common cause of farmers welfare.

In conclusion, the department of agriculture is functioning as a connecting link between the new technology and its ultimate consumer (farmer), liaisening with other line developmental departments, through various extension services by effectively implementing programmes for overall and sustainable development of farming families.

Organizational Flow chart of Department of Agriculture in Karnataka

Organization
Sl.No Contents Dharwad Hubli Kalaghatgi Kundgol Navalgund Total
1 Revenue Villages 128 66 87 57 59 397
2 Gram Panchayats 37 19 27 22 22 127
3 Towns 2 1 1 1 2 7
4 Raith Sampark Kendra 4 3 3 2 2 14
5 No of Rain Guage Stations. 7 5 3 2 3 20
6 Normal Rainfall(in mm) 838.5 693.0 939.7 777.9 612.1 772.2
7 Actual Rainfall (in mm) 926.3 599.4 1101.4 577.1 469.9 734.8
8 No of Rainy Days 2011 70 64 91 52 35 62
9 Area in Square K.M 1118 737 688 649 1082 4274
10 Geographical Area (in Hectors) 111788 73707 68757 64859 108218 427329
11 Cultivable Area (in Heactors) 81244 61517 41176 60415 102471 346823
12 Forest Area (in Hectors) 13676 2033 19526 0 0 35235
13 Land put on non Agriculture use 8817 5605 3746 1642 2762 22572
14 Barren & Uncultivable land 680 1037 956 665 647 3985
15 Cultivable waste (in Hectors) 1531 106 789 173 61 2669
16 Permenant pastures & other graz land 1959 607 688 312 5 3571
17 Land under tree groves 0 63 18 118 3 202
18 Current fallow 7831 13676 2982 2467 21323 48279
19 Total sowing Area (2010-11) 115973 82557 51754 103524 158223

512031

20 Net Sown Area ( 2010-11) 77294 50580 40043 59482 83417 310816
21 Area Sown More than once (2010-11) 38679 31977 11711 44042 74806 201215
22 Marginal farmers 6959 5502 5209 4802 3782 26254
23 Small farmers 9552 7054 6871 7453 9704 40634
24 Other farmers 13687 10448 7410 10167 17427 59139
25 No of Total Farmers 30198 23004 19490 22422 30913 126027
26

Irrigated Area

a) Canals (2010-11)

0 2594 0 0 62118 64712
  b) Tanks 45 0 36 0 0 81
  c) Open Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0
  d) Bore Wells 11351 5214 6473 857 63 23958
  e) Other Source 11 0 0 0 0 11
27

Total Irrigated Area (2010-11)

11407 7808 6509 857 62181 88762
28 Area Irrigated more than once (2012-11) 2354 1940 2539 372 30450 37655
29 Population ( 2001 Census) Rural Gents 103941 66000 63294 72090 65950 371275
  Women 98730 62380 59042 60123 62786 351061
  Urban Population Gents 8298 403085 7486 8650 24410 451929
  Women 7992 383110 7194 8190 23502 429988
  Total 218961 914575 137016 157053 176648 1604253
30 S.C Population Gents 6590 38730 7501 6884 7329 67007
  Women 6489 37486 7295 6544 7148 64962
  Total 13079 76189 14796 13428 14477 131969
31 S.T Population Gents 7119 15542 3854 5248 4471 39234
  Women 6808 14738 3418 4995 4249 34208
  Total 13927 30280 7272 10243 8720 70442
32 Agriculture Labours 20735 45018 10690 15238 12696 104650

Maps

Dharwad Agri
Agro
Agro
Agro
Agro
Agro
Agro
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